About your Search

20121226
20130103
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
of perspective. you've seen speakers calling for 600 billion in healthcare savings over the next ten years. the president said a lower number f. -- lower number. if we take the president's reported to be his most recent number of 400 billion in savings in healthcare over the next ten years. what are we going to be spend on healthcare over the next ten years? over $11 trillion. so at the president's number the spending would represent 3.6% of what we're projected to spend in healthcare over the next decade. we can't save 3.6%? really? you know we're in a situation where 5% of medicare beneficiaries use half of the money. 5% of the beneficiaries use half of the money. certainly we can save 3.6% by doing a better job of coordinating the care of people who are using most of the resources. we've done enough studies i think to conclude we could deliver better healthcare and save money by better coordinating the care of those who are using most of the money. you look at the overall circumstance in this country in terms of what we're spending on healthcare. for 2010, which is the most recent year
obama's health care act come to the table? >> i sat down with one of our health-care reporters at seek to roll call -- cq roll call. they were going for some sort of repeal on it. even though people are certainly not happy with it, maybe some of the theatrics we see
at some of the changes to expect in the health-care industry in 2013. analysts will look at how advances in the field of robotics in aviation and other fields helped to create a health-care technology revolution. this discussion was part of the world in 2013, held in new york city, hosted by the publication "the economist. this is -- "the economist." this is 25 minutes. >> thank you. i have the pleasure of talking about health care in 2013. 2013 will be a big year for health care. there is enormous amount of exciting research on health and personalized medicine. at the same time, the affordable care act is continuing its torturous implementation with 2014 as the big year when medicaid will be expanded, people will be required to get insurance, and the continuing question of how you expand access to health care, improve health care, lower-cost is going to heat up in the next year if that is possible. the tenor of the debate in the last few years. we have esther dyson, the chairman of edventure holdings. she is also trained as an astronaut and says going into space is much easier than heal
in technology that could impact the health-care industry. as part of the world in 2013 festival, hosted by the economist. it is 30 minutes. [applause] >> i have the pleasure of talking about health care in 2013. 2013 is going to be a big year for health care. there's an enormous amount of exciting research in mobile health and personalized medicine, at the same time the the affordable care act is continuing its torturous implementation with 2014 as the big year when medicaid will be expanded, when people will be required to get insurance, and the continuing question of how to expand access to healthcare, how to improve health care, or costs is going to heat up in the next year. to discuss these issues we have the chairman of adventure holdings. she has also trained as an astronaut. please welcome esther. [applause] >> good morning. i am going to talk briefly and make predictions for three markets concerning health. they are the markets for health care, the market for bad health, and the market for health itself. the health-care market is what you think of, drugs, pharma, insurance compa
they did not have to do before. you have to choose your pension plan, your healthcare plan, paper or plastic. you have everything thrown in your lap, and maybe most important is the information you choose to consume. you are what you eat. if you eat nothing but chocolate pudding your entire life, then you can venture out there and very your diet. it is all there. there are so many times when i have spoken in public forums and people will say, why are the media not covering x? how did you find out about that? it was on page 6, but they thought it should be on page one. the media you consume are not reflecting your priorities. they are run by people. if you go straight to google news, you can have an algorithm doing that search for you. i think you just have to swallow hard, do a lot, and realize this is all up to you now. i am not startling for the world that was at all. >> that task of leaving it up to you can be kind of frightening. >> you have to find people you can trust. when you watch cbs or it read the new york times, those were your aggregators. it is not about "here is wha
and reform entitlements looking at the health-care programs and retirement programs, to are under real stress -- which are under real stress. any plan has to look at all parts of the budget. the fiscal cliff is an across- the-board whack and that would put us back into recession. we can protect people that depend on these programs and so that we do raise significant revenues. we believe any plan has to be a bipartisan. it is about the country. it's interesting is how many people have stepped forward and saying to congress, stop making the situation worse. if you make the hard choices, the campaign to fix the debt will be there. a group of people are saying we support you in making hard choices. so far, we do not see that fix in place. there is real risk to the economy if we wait too long. host: you spend some time on wall street. the market was down on friday. could it happened this week? guest: anything could happen this week. the markets don't know what to make about what is going on on capitol hill. we do not know what kind of deal is going to come out of this. it seems impossible the deal
. there are the markets for health-care -- they are the markets for health care, and the market for health itself. the health-care market is what you think of as drugs, pharma, hospitals, doctors. in the u.s. we have in quotes, health reform. things are turning toward people -- keeping people healthy rather than treating them when they're sick. the drug companies are going to continue to win because they cannot charge enough money for drugs. the insurance companies are going to whine because they have to treat people that are sick as opposed to just a healthy ones they. it will figure out how to align their incentives without -- the government is not tgoing to pay [inaudible] to change their processes to improve that kind of thing. that will continue over. -- overall, it is pretty good but do not expect any changes. the market for bad health, companies are beginning to understand the need to permit out healthy food. they're going to put new additives in the same old bad food. now you have fruit bars with yogurt, or candy with fiber. watch out for more of that. it is hard because there is the huge
not need to have the most expensive and least efficient health-care system of the major countries, and we could do it by taking principles that are being applied now in some states and are part of that health-care reform. this is within our capacity and what we should have focused on. host: "the washington times" has this headline -- let's look at what nancy pelosi have to say about passage of the bill. here is a statement her office . yet you voted against it. guest: i have a great deal of respect for what and nancy pelosi did, fighting for principles that would not be there but for her focus and the determination of the democratic caucus. there are a number of provisions that i care deeply about i have been the leading sponsor of extending renewable energy, for example. what, i guess, is missing here in this equation is being able to actually implement the reform. i think the work that leader nancy pelosi did, if it were focused on the bigger picture, if the administration made clear, for instance, that we would not have a deal unless we dealt with the debt limit that has already been e
largest and expensive military, the lowest taxes, the most expensive and inefficient health-care system, and continue to allow infrastructure to fall apart all while america out grows and ages. this agreement represents the least we could have done under these circumstances and tragically, it institutionalizes for the next congress the madness of the short-term frenzy around artificial deadlines to drive the american public crazy. not only can we do better but we must do better. this flawed, partial plan is not just a lost opportunity but represents a real setback. host: back to your phone calls on what is going on in congress. republican line from arkansas. caller: i pay health insurance every month. every year i end up paying $600 and it just goes up. on the issue of medicare in the fiscal cliff, you get 1.5% taken out of your paycheck or the past 20 years. why can we not raise that to the amount people pay for future health care? that would not bother me one bit. that is not a tax increase. it's an economic issue that health insurance costs have gone up but they have never raise the
and reform entitlements looking at the health-care programs and retirement programs, which are under real stress. any plan has to look at all parts of the budget. the fiscal cliff is an across- the-board whack and that would put us back into recession. we can protect people that depend on these programs and so that we do raise significant revenues. we believe any plan has to be a bipartisan. it is about the country. it's interesting is how many people have stepped forward and saying to congress, stop making the situation worse. if you make the hard choices, the campaign to fix the debt will be there. a group of people are saying we support you in making hard choices. so far, we do not see that fix in place. there is real risk to the economy if we wait too long. host: you spend some time on wall street. the market was down on friday. could it happened this week? guest: anything could happen this week. the markets don't know what to make about what is going on on capitol hill. we do not know what kind of deal is going to come out of this. it seems impossible the deal will be big enough to h
a retirement benefit, a health-care benefit, those are entitlements, two, up to and including the entitlements for the congressman. let's be fair. when they start talking about entitlements and hold it to those three items, let's hold their feet to the fire and make them talk about entitlements for the other folks, too. host: appreciate you calling this morning. donna writes about this on twitter. if that to facebook here. -- back to you facebook here. budget showdown hits the keep week. that is of the front page reminding us of the deadline looming. it is a bloomberg story here out of the district. i you can watch the byplay here on the c-span that works with the president heading back to town tonight. the senate and house are due back tomorrow. billy from jacksonville, florida, to life for waiting. caller: i am very optimistic but i worry that the president will not get a chance because lindsey gramm already stated he will fight. i think there will already be another big fight for the debt ceiling. host: how does that make you optimistic that? caller: they know they have to do something, and
in the healthcare law to providers. 50 million people rely on this program. it benefits individuals over the age of 65. a lot of people depend on it. host: what is the current budget for medicare? guest: about $550 billion for this year. host: does that include the premiums that seniors pay? guest: what they pay it will go to the payments that will go to the doctors that care for the beneficiary. host: how much is coming out of general revenue? guest: the beneficiaries pay 25% of the program in part b. in part d, you have about 32 beneficiaries that are on the program. host: medicare is divided into four parts. part a is hospital insurance. host: how did the affordable care act change medicare? guest: it will take $716 billion away from medicare providers. the payments will still grow. providers of care will see their reimbursements decrease. beneficiaries receive some new services. they will get some help if they are enrolled in the drug program. they will be helped to close the donut hole. host: how is medicare being looked at? guest: medicare providers will be cut by 2%. providers will be cut
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)